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CHILD SAFETY SEAT CHECK

Saturday, December 10, 2016

9:00am-12:00pm

at the the Cornell Grounds Shop located at 307 Palm Road

The Cornell Police will have trained Child Passenger Safety Technicians on site to provide instruction in the proper installation, use, and maintenance of child safety seats.  For more information, please contact the Cornell Police Crime Prevention Unit at G2 Barton Hall, 607-255-7404 or 255-7305. 

 

CHILD SAFETY SEAT PROGRAM

 

New York State Law requires all children under the age of 8 to be restrained in a federally-approved child restraint system.

The Cornell University Police have instituted a Child Safety Seat Program. This Program is funded through a grant from the New York State Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee. This grant allows the Cornell University Police to purchase a limited number of child safety seats and make them available to families in the Cornell Community, pending application approval. Link here for program guidelines.

Child Safety Seat inspections and installations are by appointment only except at scheduled events listed below, you may make an appointment by calling (607) 255-7305.

Families in the Cornell Community who qualify under the New York State WIC Income Eligibility Guidelines or who qualify under any New York State Public Assistance Program may be eligible to receive a free child safety seat. All inquiries and applications are confidential.  [Electronic Application]  [PDF Application]

Families attending a Child Safety Seat Check event will receive a free child safety seat if the Child Passenger Safety Technician inspecting their child safety seat discovers the seat is on the federal recall list, has been involved in an accident or determines for some reason should not be used.

Please contact us for further information: 

Cornell Police Crime Prevention Unit
G-2 Barton Hall
Ithaca , N.Y. 14853-1701
E-mail: crime_prevention@cornell.edu
Phone: (607) 255-7305
Fax: (607) 255-5916

 

New York State Law requires all children under the age of 8 to be restrained in a federally-approved child restraint system.

 Car Seat Recommendations for Children:

  • Select a car seat based on your child’s age and size, and choose a seat that fits in your vehicle and use it every time.
  • Always refer to your specific car seat manufacturer’s instructions; read the vehicle owner’s manual on how to install the car seat using the seat belt or LATCH system; and check height and weight limits.
  • To maximize safety, keep your child in the car seat for as long as possible, as long as the child fits within the manufacturer’s height and weight requirements.
  • Keep your child in the back seat at least through age 12.

For a printable copy of the Car Seat - 4-Steps Brochure (pdf)

Age

Recommendations

Birth – 12 months
Your child under age 1 should always ride in a rear-facing car seat.
There are different types of rear-facing car seats: Infant-only seats can only be used rear-facing. Convertible and 3-in-1 car seats typically have higher height and weight limits for the rear-facing position, allowing you to keep your child rear-facing for a longer period of time.
1 – 3 years
Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness.
4 – 7 years
Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward-facing car seat with a harness, it’s time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.
8 – 12 years
Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie snug across the shoulder and chest and not cross the neck or face. Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

 

DESCRIPTION (RESTRAINT TYPE)

A REAR-FACING CAR SEAT is the best seat for your young child to use. It has a harness and in a crash, cradles and moves with your child to reduce the stress to the child’s fragile neck and spinal cord.
A FORWARD-FACING CAR SEAT has a harness and tether that limits your child’s forward movement during a crash.
A BOOSTER SEAT positions the seat belt so that it fits properly over the stronger parts of your child’s body.
A SEAT BELT should lie across the upper thighs and be snug across the shoulder and chest to restrain the child safely in a crash. It should not rest on the stomach area or across the neck.